icon for Home page
icon for Kid's Home page
icon for Digital Collection
icon for Activities
icon for Turns Exhibit
icon for In the Classroom
icon for Chronologies
icon for My Collection

Online Collection

document
(c) Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield MA. All rights reserved.
Contact us for information about using this image.



label levels:

There is currently no available "Beginner" label. The following is the default level label: Francis Cabot Lowell (1775-1817), the man who brought the power loom to the United States, envisioned an entire community involved in textile production. Although he died in 1817, his investors kept his vision and purchased land around Pawtucket falls on the Merrimack River as well as the rights to a small canal there. They built several mills, the first of which opened in 1823. This is a report about three of the largest companies in 1835. Collectively they used twelve million, two hundred fifty-six thousand, four hundred pounds of cotton per year. By 1848, Lowell mills produced fifty thousand miles of cotton cloth per year--enough to circle the world twice. Ironically all of the cotton was grown and processed by slave labor in the Southern states while the abolitionist states of the North profited highly from the textiles made with cotton.

 

top of page

"Lowell" article regarding cotton mills from Greenfield Gazette and Franklin Herald newspaper

publisher   Greenfield Gazette and Franklin Herald
date   May 12, 1835
location   Greenfield, Massachusetts
height   8.25"
width   4.25"
process/materials   printed paper, ink
item type   Periodicals/Newspaper
accession #   #L05.045


Look Closer icon My Collection icon Transcription icon Detailed info icon


ecard icon Send an e-Postcard of this object



See Also...

Pages from "The Great South: A Record of Journeys" on cotton statistics in U.S.

Spinning Jenny

Spinning Equipment


button for Side by Side Viewingbutton for Glossarybutton for Printing Helpbutton for How to Read Old Documents

 

Home | Online Collection | Things To Do | Turns Exhibit | Classroom | Chronologies | My Collection
About This Site | Site Index | Site Search | Feedback