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Saco, Feb. 22, 1921.

Dear Alice,

The rest of the family
are at the Birthday entertainment,
and bazaar which Annie has getting
up. I have been this P.M. & prefer
home tonight. Nothing has happened
since I wrote before but the end of
the great snowstorm & the prospect
of another,- with a bright sunny
day between. Boston & N.Y. are
complaining but the storm was an
ideal one here.

Did I write that a women's move-
had run a caucus here in the interest
of better city govt? Yes, & the outcome
was to unhorse the boss who has had
his way- a bad one- for years; &
has been used to buying votes, to
largely exempt the York Mills, of
which he has been the agent, from full

(c) Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield MA. All rights reserved.
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There is currently no available "Beginner" label. The following is the default level label: This letter from Reverend Henry H. Barber to his daughter Alice B. Coleman describes the downfall of a political boss in the town of Saco, Maine. A political boss is a person who holds a great deal of power in their particular area. They played a major roll in the politics of the 19th and early 20th centuries here in the United States. Mr. Page was apparently the head of York Mills, a large cotton manufacturer which, at the turn of the century, operated eight mills in the Factory Island Mill District of Saco. As head of this large employer, Page had quite a bit of power over how people voted, and was even able to keep the mill from being taxed at the full rate. The nineteenth amendment, which granted women the right to vote, was ratified on August 26, 1920. It only took the women of Saco six months after that to become a force in bettering city government and ousting Page. Page died shortly after the election, and Barber refers to it as a variation on the Ananias case, which is a biblical reference to a character in the New Testament who was struck dead for lying.


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Letter from Rev. Henry H. Barber to his daughter Alice B. Coleman re: Boss Politics

author   Henry [Rev] Hervey Barber (1835-1923)
date   Feb 22, 1921
location   Maine
height   8.5"
width   5.25"
process/materials   manuscript, paper, ink
item type   Personal Documents/Letter
accession #   #L10.001

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